PRESS RELEASE July-17-2019

Sweeney Speaks at Building Trades Convention

Atlantic City – Senate President Steve Sweeney addressed the 115th Annual Convention of the NJ State Building & Construction Trades Council, at the Hard Rock Hotel-Casino in Atlantic City today where he spoke about the important role of trade workers in fueling the economy and the need to make New Jersey more affordable for working families. The Convention drew up to 300 delegates from trade unions throughout New Jersey as well as distinguished state and national guests.

“We are here with the hard working men and women of the trade unions united in our efforts to move New Jersey forward with s strong economy and a state that is affordable for all working families,” said Senator Sweeney (D-Gloucester/Salem/Cumberland). “The work of our brothers and sisters in the building and trades unions is a vital part of an economy that continues to thrive. But we need to bring fiscal responsibility to public finances so that we can make the investments that will expand opportunities for everyone. That can only be accomplished by making the needed reforms from the Path to Progress agenda. It will shape economic growth for our future.”

The two day conference includes workshops on issues of great interest to the union building trades, including business expansion, infrastructure funding and renewal, the development of safe, clean energy resources and workplace standards.

William T. Mullen, President of the 150,000-member Trades Council, said, “The first priority of our building trades council in 2019 is to encourage a political climate that allows legislators of each party and people of various ideologies to work in support of initiatives to promote the common good of workers and the state. Senator Sweeney has always been a true ally of working men and women and he always fights for our needs and priorities. ”

Senator Sweeney also serves as the General Vice President of the International Association of Bridge, Structural, Ornamental and Reinforcing Iron Workers.

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